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Are you inviting someone to Canada and require a notarized Invitation Letter?
An Invitation Letter outlines 3 key things about visitors to Canada:
  • They have a genuine reason to visit
  • They have a host who will provide accommodations and financial support during their stay
  • They intend to return to their home country after their visit and are not at risk for overstaying their visa
What is an Invitation Letter?
An Invitation Letter is a formal document that invites someone to visit Canada and clearly outlines the reason that they’re visiting. The letter is written by a Canadian citizen or permanent resident to invite the visitor. Most often, this is done by people inviting their loved ones to special events like weddings or birthdays, by students inviting their family memebers to visit during the semester, or for businesses inviting their international collaborators to visit.
What details or information does an Invitation Letter contain?
The list below outlines the information you will want to include in your invitation letter.

  • Sender’s Information: If you or your business is inviting someone to Canada, ensure that you include your full name, address, and your or your business’ contact information.
  • Visitor’s Information: Ensure that the letter includes the full name, address, and contact information of the person being invited to Canada.
  • Date and Length of Stay: The specific dates of the visit should be mentioned, including the start and end date of the visitor’s intended stay in Canada.
  • Purpose of Visit: The invitation letter must also explain the purpose of the visit. This can be for tourism, business meetings, conferences, family visit, or any other reason.
  • Relationship to the Visitor: Disclosing the relationship between you and the visitor (if they’re a family member, work with you, etc.) helps establish the credibility and authenticity of the invitation.
  • The Visitor’s Itinerary: If there’s a planned itinerary for the visit, please include it in your invitation letter. Providing details of the different places the visitor plans to go, events they’ll attend, or business meetings to be conducted, should be mentioned in the invitation letter.
  • Financial Responsibility: Be sure to include who will be financially responsible for the visitor’s expenses during their stay in Canada. This section of the letter can include details about where the person will be staying, how they’ll get around, and any other financial support provided.
  • Accommodation Details: Make sure to include the address and contact information of the place where the visitor will be staying in the letter, even if they’re staying with you.
  • Declaration of Invitation: It’s important to clearly state that the sender is inviting the recipient to visit Canada and that they take responsibility for the visitor during their stay. Notarization: Having the invitation letter notarized adds an extra level of authenticity and credibility to the document.
One of the most important pieces of information to include is that your visitor doesn’t intend to stay in Canada beyond the duration of their trip. That’s why it’s good to include reasons that your visitor has to return to their home country (an established job, attending school, other responsibilities, etc.). Specific details and information required may vary depending on the purpose of the person’s visit, country-specific immigration requirements, and the relationship between the sender and the visitor. If you’re unsure about the process or have a unique legal situation, it’s best to speak with a legal professional.
What other documents do I need with my Invitation Letter?
Depending on the type of Canadian Visa the visitor is applying for, the additional documents that you’ll need to include with the invitation letter may vary. Some of the most common documents are:
  • Proof of Identity: A clear copy of your valid passport or government-issued identification document should be provided. This includes the personal information page showing your name, photo, date of birth, and passport/ID number. This step is important for both the sender and the visitor.
  • Proof of Canadian Citizenship or Permanent Residency: As the person inviting your visitor to Canada, you must be a Canadian citizen or permanent resident. With the letter, be sure to include a copy of your citizenship certificate, permanent resident card or birth certificate.
  • Proof of Relationship (if applicable): If the visitor is coming to Canada for a family reunion or to visit a relative, including documents such as birth certificates, marriage certificates, or other evidence helps establish the relationship between the host and the visitor.
  • Proof of Accommodation: Provide documentation to confirm that the visitor has accommodations lined up for their entire stay in Canada. This can include a hotel reservation confirmation, lease agreement, or a letter from the host confirming the visitor’s accommodation arrangements.
  • Financial Support Documentation: If you are financially supporting the visitor during their stay, you’ll need to provide proof of your financial capacity. This can be done through bank statements, a letter of employment, or other financial documents to demonstrate your ability to cover their expenses for the time they’ll be visiting.
  • Travel Itinerary: Though this was already mentioned, including flight reservations, a detailed schedule of activities, or prepaid tickets to events or attractions can help validate the purpose and length of the trip.
  • Employment Verification: If the visitor is employed in their home country, including a letter from their employer stating their position, length of employment, salary, and permission for their time off for their visit, can help further support their visa application.
  • Travel Medical Insurance: It’s important for visitors to Canada to have travel medical insurance. Be sure to include proof of travel medical insurance coverage that lasts for the entire length of their trip.
  • Proof of Return: To help demonstrate the visitor’s intention to return to their home country after they visit Canada, including evidence such as employment contracts, property ownership, or ties to their home country can help.
Please note that the specific documents required can vary between individuals, so it’s recommended to consult the official website of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) or seek advice from a qualified immigration professional to ensure you include all necessary documents based on your specific situation.
Do I need to have my Invitation Letter notarized?
Having an invitation letter notarized adds credibility and authenticity to the document. It demonstrates that the letter has undergone a thorough verification process, making it more reliable and trustworthy. While not always mandatory, notarization increases the chances of a successful visa application and shows your commitment to providing accurate information.

If you need a notarized custom statutory declaration you’re in the right place.

A statutory declaration is a legal document that is used to declare information to be true. It is a written statement sworn before a person who is authorised to administer oaths, such as a notary public or a commissioner of oaths. Statutory declarations are commonly used in a variety of legal and administrative situations, such as:
  • Confirming identity or citizenship
  • Verifying the accuracy of documents or information
  • Making a declaration of residency
  • Declaring a common-law relationship or marriage
  • Providing evidence of financial status or assets
What is a statutory declaration in Canada?
A statutory declaration in Canada is a legal document where someone declares information to be true, made under oath or affirmation before a notary public or commissioner of oaths. It is commonly used in various legal and administrative situations, such as (but not limited to):
  • When financial institutions are looking to transfer money from the estate of someone who has passed to those legally entitled to deal with their estate
  • When someone needs to affirm the type of goods for export or import
  • If a company director is declaring the solvency of their company when going into members’ voluntary liquidation
  • If a defendant who was not aware of criminal proceedings against them until after the trial began, needs to provide an explanation for their absence
  • In case a parent needs to register a child’s birth in circumstances where both parents cannot go in person to the register office
  • By someone applying to update their legal gender
  • If you’re applying for a pension
  • For declaring marital status
  • When swearing or affirming facts
  • For legal name changes
  • For construction payments for new homes
  • When filing an insurance claim
What details or information should a general Statutory Declaration contain?
A statutory declaration in Canada should include the following details:
  • The title “Statutory Declaration”
  • The declarant’s (the person who is making the solemn declaration) full legal name, address, and occupation
  • A statement that the declaration is made under oath or affirmation
  • The purpose of the declaration and the relevant details of the matter being declared
  • A statement that the declarant believes the information provided to be true and accurate
  • The declarant’s signature, the date the declaration was signed, and the location where it was signed
  • The signature and printed name of the notary public or commissioner of oaths
The specific details required in a statutory declaration can vary depending on the purpose of the declaration and the legal or administrative context in which it is being used. It is important to ensure that all required details are included and that the declaration is accurate and truthful, as making a false declaration can have serious legal consequences.
What is the difference between an Affidavit and a Statutory Declaration in Canada?
A statutory declaration is a written statement of fact that is declared to be true. It is typically used outside of court, such as in administrative matters or for the purposes of obtaining government services. An affidavit is also a written statement of fact that is sworn or affirmed to be true. It is typically used in legal proceedings and is subject to the rules of evidence in court. Both statutory declarations and affidavits must be signed and witnessed by a commissioner of oaths or a notary public.
When is a statutory declaration required in Canadian law?
Statutory declarations may be required by government agencies, financial institutions, employers, or other organisations in order to confirm the accuracy of information or to comply with legal or regulatory requirements. A statutory declaration is authorized by the Canada Evidence Act and is used to assert the truth of any fact or facts, or of any account rendered in writing. A person is guilty of an offence if he/she makes a false statutory declaration. In some cases, statutory declarations may be required by law as a condition of eligibility for certain benefits or privileges. It is important to ensure that all required statutory declarations are accurate and truthful, as making a false declaration can have serious legal consequences.

If you’re planning to register a vehicle to a business in Ontario and require a RIN Request Letter, you’re in the right place.

A RIN is a unique 9-digit identification number that is assigned to a business by Ontario’s Ministry of Transportation (MTO). This number is used to identify the corporation or business as the registered owner of a vehicle, rather than an individual. To obtain a RIN, you’ll need to provide the MTO with some basic information about your corporation or business, including:
  • its name
  • address
  • business number
  • a notarized RIN request letter
What is a RIN Request Letter for Company Vehicle in Ontario?
In Ontario, A RIN is a 9-digit number the MTO assigns to a company vehicle. This number demonstrates that a business has registered its company vehicle(s) with the Ministry of Transportation. In order to get a RIN, you need to send the MTO a RIN request letter, and have it sworn before a notary public or commissioner of oaths. In the RIN request letter, you would request that a vehicle be registered under your business’s name. Once the MTO receives the request letter, they will review it and verify the information you provided. If the request is approved, the MTO will issue your business a unique 9-digit RIN with a barcode.
What Details Does a RIN Letter Require?
When requesting a RIN for your company, you’ll need to provide the MTO with some basic information about your corporation or business, including:
  • Your full name and position at the company
  • Your corporation’s name
  • Your corporate address
  • The purpose of your RIN letter request
  • Make, model, year, colour, and class
  • Vehicle identification number
What Other Documents Do I Need with a RIN Request Letter?
The specific documents required may vary depending on the type of business, but in general, the following documents should be included:
  • A notarized RIN request letter written by someone with the authority to bind the organization, like an owner or director. A notary public must verify your identity, verify your business documents, and affix a notarial seal to your RIN letter.
  • One identification document for your business (e.g., articles of incorporation or amendment, or a letter of good standing).
  • Two documents that show proof of your business’s address (e.g., an insurance pink slip or a copy of a utility bill). These can be physical copies or digital.
  • Identification documents for the person authorized to sign the request letter, such as a driver’s license or passport.
  • A detailed description of the business or organization’s activities and how they relate to vehicle registration.
It is important to carefully review the MTO’s requirements on their website and ensure that all necessary documents are included to avoid any delays in the processing of the application.
How Do I Apply for a RIN Number for a Business Vehicle in Ontario?
To apply for a RIN number to register a business vehicle in Ontario, you need to send a notarized request letter to the MTO. The letter should include your business or organization’s name, address, phone number, and any other relevant information requested by the MTO. You will also need to provide documentation proving your eligibility for a RIN, such as business registration documents and identification documents for the person authorized to sign the request letter. For more detailed information for applying for a RIN number for your business, please refer to our blog, Guide to Ontario’s Registrant Identification Number (RIN).

Have a minor travelling alone or without one legal guardian? You’re in the right place.
The Government of Canada strongly recommends that children under the age of majority (18 or 19, depending on the province or territory of residence) carry a notarized travel consent letter when travelling:
  • Alone
  • With only one parent
  • With relatives
    What is a travel consent letter for children travelling abroad?
    A Travel Consent Letter, sometimes referred to as a consent to travel letter, or child travel consent form, is a legal document that gives permission for a child to travel outside their home country alone, with one one of their parents, or with another guardian. This letter is usually required by immigration authorities to prove that the child has the consent of their parents or legal guardians to travel and that the child is not being abducted or taken out of the country without their knowledge or approval. When you create a travel consent letter, important information about the child including their full name, date of birth, passport number, travel itinerary, and contact information for their parents or legal guardians, must be included. Without a letter you may not be able to travel with your child – this includes being prevented from boarding flights until authorities can get into contact with the other parent or guardian.
    What details or information does the travel consent letter contain?
    Travel Consent Letters should always include the full names of the child and their parents or legal guardians, the date the letter was written and signed, and a clear statement of consent for the child to travel. It is also important to have the letter notarized to make it an official legal document. Travel consent letters can help prevent potential problems or delays at border crossings and ensure that the child’s travel experience is safe and hassle-free.
    What other documents do I need with the travel consent letter?
    In addition to the Travel Consent Letter and often a provincial birth certificate, children are also required to have their own valid passport. Depending on family circumstances, the following documents may also be required:
    • Divorce papers
    • Child custody orders or agreements
    • Death certificate of a parent or parents
    Do both parents need to sign the Travel Consent Letter?
    Travel Consent Letters should be signed by parents who are not accompanying the child on a trip, including: One or both parents who are married or in a common-law relationship and live together with the child. Both parents usually have custody rights over the child. However, the Government of Canada also recommends that you contact a lawyer about you and your children’s unique situation.
    I’m a teen travelling with friends – do I need a travel consent letter?
    If you’re travelling abroad with friends (or siblings!) who are above the age of majority, it’s still best to be prepared with a consent letter signed by both of your parents.  Make sure that your letter explains that they are in support of your trip and that your travel companions are acting as your guardians; be sure to include all your parents’ contact information as well.
    With guardians who are not related (like when they’re on a school trip)
A Statutory Declaration of Common-Law Union is:
  • Used to establish the legal recognition of a common-law relationship.
  • Provides proof of the duration and nature of the relationship.
  • Allows you and your partner to access certain benefits and rights available to legally recognized couples.
What is a Statutory Declaration of Common-Law Union?
In Canada, a statutory declaration of common-law union is a legal document that serves as evidence of a common-law relationship. By submitting this declaration, you and your partner affirm that you have been living together in a committed relationship, similar to a marriage, but without a formal marriage certificate. This document helps establish the legal recognition of your common-law union for various purposes within Canada.
What details or information does a Statutory Declaration of Common-Law Union contain?
A statutory declaration of common-law union typically includes the following details:
  • Personal Information: The declaration should include the full legal names, current addresses, dates of birth, and contact information of both partners.
  • Relationship Details: The declaration should outline the nature and duration of the common-law relationship, including the date when you and your partner began living together as a couple.
  • Shared Life: The declaration may require you to provide information about how you and your partner share responsibilities, finances, and make joint decisions.
  • Witness Information: The declaration usually includes space for the signature and contact information of one or more witnesses who can attest to the authenticity of your relationship.
  • Notarization: The declaration should include a section for both partners to sign the document in the presence of a notary public or commissioner of oaths. The notary will then use their official seal or stamp and sign the document to certify its authenticity.
Please note that the exact details and information required in a statutory declaration of common-law union may vary depending on the specific requirements of your jurisdiction or the purpose for which the declaration is being prepared. It is advisable to consult with a legal professional to ensure all necessary information is included.
When would I need a Statutory Declaration of Common-Law Union?
You may need to use a statutory declaration of common-law union if you and your partner have been living together in a committed relationship without being legally married. This document helps establish the legal recognition of your common-law union and may be required for various purposes, such as accessing benefits, rights, or proving your relationship for immigration or legal matters.
Do I need to have my Statutory Declaration of Common-Law Union notarized?
Yes! A statutory declaration of common-law union needs to be notarized. This document requires both partners to sign the declaration in the presence of a notary public or commissioner of oaths.
Need help writing an affidavit? If you’re involved in a Canadian legal proceeding and require a notarized custom affidavit, you’re in the right place.
A general affidavit is a legal document that is used to provide evidence in court or to support other legal proceedings. The contents of an affidavit must be true, accurate, and complete to the best of the affiant’s (the person swearing the affidavit) knowledge and belief. A general affidavit can be used in various legal matters, such as:
  • civil litigation,
  • family law,
  • Canadian immigration,
  • and more
What is a general affidavit in Canada?
An affidavit in Canada is a legal document that contains a sworn statement of facts relevant to a particular legal matter. It is used as evidence in court or to support other legal proceedings. An affidavit template may be used to help you create a customized document for your legal proceedings. It’s important to note that oaths in the country of Canada are required when providing a solemn affirmation or making a sworn statement. When someone signs an affidavit, they are doing so under oath in the presence of a notary public or another person who is authorized to administer oaths, like a commissioner of oaths.
How do I customize my affidavit?
A general affidavit in Canada should include all the necessary information to support the legal matter at hand. The information should be true, accurate, and complete to the best of the your knowledge and belief. Here are some of the key elements that should be included:
  • The heading: This should state the name of the court or administrative tribunal, the name of the case or application, and the name of the person who swore the affidavit.
  • The date and place of the affidavit: This should be stated at the beginning of the document, and should include the city, province or territory.
  • An introduction: This should include the person who swore the affidavit’s full name, address, occupation, and relationship to the others involved.
  • The body of the affidavit: This is where you’ll write a include a clear and concise statement of relevant facts. The facts should be organised in a logical manner and should be supported by any available documentation or evidence. A good affidavit has all the information a judge needs to make a decision.
  • A statement of the affiant’s (the person swearing the affidavit) belief in the truth of the information provided:After you finished stating your facts and beliefs, this statement may appear as something like, “I swear (or affirm) that the contents of this affidavit are true to the best of my knowledge and belief.”
  • The signature of the person swearing the affidavit: After a person creates an affidavit, it should be signed in the presence of a notary public or commissioner of oaths (commissioner authorized to administer oaths).
  • The signature of the notary public or commissioner of oaths: This person is authorized to administer oaths, and will certify that the affidavit was sworn or affirmed before them.
The specific requirements may vary depending on the nature of the legal matter and the rules of the court or administrative tribunal involved. It is always advisable to seek legal advice or guidance from a qualified professional when dealing with legal matters that require an affidavit.
What is the difference between an Affidavit and a Statutory Declaration in Canada?
An affidavit is a written statement of fact that is sworn or affirmed to be true. It is typically used in legal proceedings and is subject to the rules of evidence in court. A statutory declaration is also a written statement of fact that is declared to be true. It is typically used outside of court, such as in administrative matters or for the purposes of obtaining government services. Both statutory declarations and affidavits must be signed and witnessed by a commissioner of oaths or a notary public.
When is an affidavit required in Canadian law?
This document may be required in Canadian law to support various legal proceedings, such as civil litigation, family law, immigration applications, and more. It may be used to provide evidence or to support an application or claim.
  • Civil Litigation: In civil litigation, parties may be required to provide affidavits to support their claims or defences. For example, a party may need to provide a sworn statement of the damages they have suffered as a result of the someone’s actions.
  • Family Law: In family law matters, affidavits may be required to support applications for custody, access, or child support. For example, a parent may need to outline their relationship with the child and why they are seeking custody or access.
  • Immigration Applications: Affidavits may be required to support various immigration applications, such as spousal sponsorship or permanent residency. For example, a Canadian citizen sponsoring their spouse for immigration may need to provide a written statement about the nature of their relationship and/or marital status and their plans for living together in Canada.
  • Criminal Proceedings: In criminal proceedings, affidavits may be used to support various applications, such as bail or search warrants. For example, a police officer may need to provide an affidavit outlining the grounds for a search warrant.
  • Administrative Law: In administrative law, affidavits may be required to support applications or appeals before administrative tribunals. For example, a person appealing a decision by the Canada Revenue Agency or the Goverment of Canada may need to provide the relevant facts and their arguments in writing.
More simply, you may need to write an affidavit for a situation involving documenting a relationship on behalf of someone else, in cases of theft or destruction to your personal property for criminal investigations or insurance claims, to collect evidence of your personal relationship for immigration or visa purposes, to create an “affidavit of support” for financial reasons – (often used for post-secondary education fees abroad), or for visitor visas to Canada.
In general, an affidavit may be required whenever it is necessary to provide evidence or support for a legal proceeding. The specific requirements may vary, so it’s always a good idea to speak with a lawyer or other legal professional about your unique case

This document outlines:
  • the terms of sale,
  • identifies the parties involved, and
  • serves as proof of the transaction.
Understanding the importance of a bill of sale and how to create one can help ensure a smooth and secure transfer of property.
What is a Bill of Sale?
A bill of sale is a written agreement that documents the sale of personal property from one party to another. In Canada, it serves as a legally binding contract between the buyer and the seller, establishing the transfer of ownership rights. This document outlines essential details such as the description of the property, purchase price, date of the sale, and the names and contact information of both parties involved. A bill of sale is essential for both parties as it provides evidence of the transaction and can be used for various purposes, including registration, insurance, or proof of ownership.
Why is a Bill of Sale important?
A bill of sale is important for several reasons:
  • Proof of Ownership: It establishes the legal transfer of ownership from the seller to the buyer, providing clear evidence of who owns the property.
  • Transaction Details: It records important information about the sale, including the purchase price, date, and description of the property. This helps prevent disputes or misunderstandings in the future.
  • Legal Protection: It protects both the buyer and the seller by documenting the terms and conditions of the sale, ensuring that both parties are aware of their rights and responsibilities.
  • Compliance Requirements: Depending on the type of property being sold, certain government agencies or institutions may require a bill of sale for registration, licensing, or insurance purposes.
What information should a Bill of Sale contain?
A bill of sale typically includes the following information:
  • Description of the Property: A detailed description of the item being sold, including any unique identifiers such as serial numbers or VIN (Vehicle Identification Number).
  • Purchase Price: The agreed-upon price for the property being sold.
  • Date of Sale: The specific date when the transaction took place.
  • Seller and Buyer Information: The full legal names, addresses, and contact information of both the seller and the buyer.
  • Payment Details: The method of payment used for the transaction (e.g., cash, check, or online transfer).
  • Warranty and Condition: Any warranties or guarantees provided by the seller, as well as a description of the current condition of the property.
  • Signatures: Signatures of both the seller and the buyer to indicate their agreement and acceptance of the terms.
Please note that the exact information required in a bill of sale may vary depending on the type of property being sold and the specific requirements of your jurisdiction. It is advisable to consult with a legal professional or use a reputable bill of sale template to ensure all necessary information is included.
Do I need to have my Bill of Sale notarized?
While notarization of a Bill of Sale is not always required, it can be a good idea to have it notarized for added legal security and authenticity. Notarization can provide peace of mind and added protection in case of any future legal complications or disputes. It is recommended to consult with a legal professional or the relevant authorities to determine if notarization is necessary or advisable for your specific transaction.
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Notary Services (by appointment only)

 

Need a document notarized? The UPS Store #121 can help with:

  • Affidavits
  • Legal documents
  • Travel consent letters
  • Residency documentation
  • Statutory declarations
  • Divorce/separation and co-habitation agreements
  • Government forms
  • Insurance Proof of Loss forms
  • Will & testaments
  • Name change applications
  • Out of province real estate documents

This service is available by appointment only. You will need to bring proper identification such as a valid driver’s license, passport, or any other government-issued ID.

To book an appointment,

to book your appointment, please use the below link

Appointment Page

or send us an email at  [email protected]

 

This service is offered by a third party notary. The UPS Store #121 management and staff are not authorized to offer notary services directly and we do not claim any responsibility for these services.

to book your appointment, please use the below link

Appointment Page

Most Popular forms in Canada

Are you inviting someone to Canada and require a notarized Invitation Letter?

An Invitation Letter outlines 3 key things about visitors to Canada:

  • They have a genuine reason to visit
  • They have a host who will provide accommodations and financial support during their stay
  • They intend to return to their home country after their visit and are not at risk for overstaying their visa
What is an Invitation Letter?
An Invitation Letter is a formal document that invites someone to visit Canada and clearly outlines the reason that they’re visiting. The letter is written by a Canadian citizen or permanent resident to invite the visitor. Most often, this is done by people inviting their loved ones to special events like weddings or birthdays, by students inviting their family memebers to visit during the semester, or for businesses inviting their international collaborators to visit.

What details or information does an Invitation Letter contain?

The list below outlines the information you will want to include in your invitation letter.

  • Sender’s Information: If you or your business is inviting someone to Canada, ensure that you include your full name, address, and your or your business’ contact information.
  • Visitor’s Information: Ensure that the letter includes the full name, address, and contact information of the person being invited to Canada.
  • Date and Length of Stay: The specific dates of the visit should be mentioned, including the start and end date of the visitor’s intended stay in Canada.
  • Purpose of Visit: The invitation letter must also explain the purpose of the visit. This can be for tourism, business meetings, conferences, family visit, or any other reason.
  • Relationship to the Visitor: Disclosing the relationship between you and the visitor (if they’re a family member, work with you, etc.) helps establish the credibility and authenticity of the invitation.
  • The Visitor’s Itinerary: If there’s a planned itinerary for the visit, please include it in your invitation letter. Providing details of the different places the visitor plans to go, events they’ll attend, or business meetings to be conducted, should be mentioned in the invitation letter.
  • Financial Responsibility: Be sure to include who will be financially responsible for the visitor’s expenses during their stay in Canada. This section of the letter can include details about where the person will be staying, how they’ll get around, and any other financial support provided.
  • Accommodation Details: Make sure to include the address and contact information of the place where the visitor will be staying in the letter, even if they’re staying with you.
  • Declaration of Invitation: It’s important to clearly state that the sender is inviting the recipient to visit Canada and that they take responsibility for the visitor during their stay.
    Notarization: Having the invitation letter notarized adds an extra level of authenticity and credibility to the document.

One of the most important pieces of information to include is that your visitor doesn’t intend to stay in Canada beyond the duration of their trip. That’s why it’s good to include reasons that your visitor has to return to their home country (an established job, attending school, other responsibilities, etc.). Specific details and information required may vary depending on the purpose of the person’s visit, country-specific immigration requirements, and the relationship between the sender and the visitor. If you’re unsure about the process or have a unique legal situation, it’s best to speak with a legal professional.

What other documents do I need with my Invitation Letter?
Depending on the type of Canadian Visa the visitor is applying for, the additional documents that you’ll need to include with the invitation letter may vary. Some of the most common documents are:
  • Proof of Identity: A clear copy of your valid passport or government-issued identification document should be provided. This includes the personal information page showing your name, photo, date of birth, and passport/ID number. This step is important for both the sender and the visitor.
  • Proof of Canadian Citizenship or Permanent Residency: As the person inviting your visitor to Canada, you must be a Canadian citizen or permanent resident. With the letter, be sure to include a copy of your citizenship certificate, permanent resident card or birth certificate.
  • Proof of Relationship (if applicable): If the visitor is coming to Canada for a family reunion or to visit a relative, including documents such as birth certificates, marriage certificates, or other evidence helps establish the relationship between the host and the visitor.
  • Proof of Accommodation: Provide documentation to confirm that the visitor has accommodations lined up for their entire stay in Canada. This can include a hotel reservation confirmation, lease agreement, or a letter from the host confirming the visitor’s accommodation arrangements.
  • Financial Support Documentation: If you are financially supporting the visitor during their stay, you’ll need to provide proof of your financial capacity. This can be done through bank statements, a letter of employment, or other financial documents to demonstrate your ability to cover their expenses for the time they’ll be visiting.
  • Travel Itinerary: Though this was already mentioned, including flight reservations, a detailed schedule of activities, or prepaid tickets to events or attractions can help validate the purpose and length of the trip.
  • Employment Verification: If the visitor is employed in their home country, including a letter from their employer stating their position, length of employment, salary, and permission for their time off for their visit, can help further support their visa application.
  • Travel Medical Insurance: It’s important for visitors to Canada to have travel medical insurance. Be sure to include proof of travel medical insurance coverage that lasts for the entire length of their trip.
  • Proof of Return: To help demonstrate the visitor’s intention to return to their home country after they visit Canada, including evidence such as employment contracts, property ownership, or ties to their home country can help.

Please note that the specific documents required can vary between individuals, so it’s recommended to consult the official website of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) or seek advice from a qualified immigration professional to ensure you include all necessary documents based on your specific situation.

Do I need to have my Invitation Letter notarized?
Having an invitation letter notarized adds credibility and authenticity to the document. It demonstrates that the letter has undergone a thorough verification process, making it more reliable and trustworthy. While not always mandatory, notarization increases the chances of a successful visa application and shows your commitment to providing accurate information.

If you need a notarized custom statutory declaration you’re in the right place.

A statutory declaration is a legal document that is used to declare information to be true. It is a written statement sworn before a person who is authorised to administer oaths, such as a notary public or a commissioner of oaths. Statutory declarations are commonly used in a variety of legal and administrative situations, such as:

  • Confirming identity or citizenship
  • Verifying the accuracy of documents or information
  • Making a declaration of residency
  • Declaring a common-law relationship or marriage
  • Providing evidence of financial status or assets
What is a statutory declaration in Canada?

A statutory declaration in Canada is a legal document where someone declares information to be true, made under oath or affirmation before a notary public or commissioner of oaths. It is commonly used in various legal and administrative situations, such as (but not limited to):

  • When financial institutions are looking to transfer money from the estate of someone who has passed to those legally entitled to deal with their estate
  • When someone needs to affirm the type of goods for export or import
  • If a company director is declaring the solvency of their company when going into members’ voluntary liquidation
  • If a defendant who was not aware of criminal proceedings against them until after the trial began, needs to provide an explanation for their absence
  • In case a parent needs to register a child’s birth in circumstances where both parents cannot go in person to the register office
  • By someone applying to update their legal gender
  • If you’re applying for a pension
  • For declaring marital status
  • When swearing or affirming facts
  • For legal name changes
  • For construction payments for new homes
  • When filing an insurance claim
What details or information should a general Statutory Declaration contain?

A statutory declaration in Canada should include the following details:

  • The title “Statutory Declaration”
  • The declarant’s (the person who is making the solemn declaration) full legal name, address, and occupation
  • A statement that the declaration is made under oath or affirmation
  • The purpose of the declaration and the relevant details of the matter being declared
  • A statement that the declarant believes the information provided to be true and accurate
  • The declarant’s signature, the date the declaration was signed, and the location where it was signed
  • The signature and printed name of the notary public or commissioner of oaths

The specific details required in a statutory declaration can vary depending on the purpose of the declaration and the legal or administrative context in which it is being used. It is important to ensure that all required details are included and that the declaration is accurate and truthful, as making a false declaration can have serious legal consequences.

What is the difference between an Affidavit and a Statutory Declaration in Canada?

A statutory declaration is a written statement of fact that is declared to be true. It is typically used outside of court, such as in administrative matters or for the purposes of obtaining government services.

An affidavit is also a written statement of fact that is sworn or affirmed to be true. It is typically used in legal proceedings and is subject to the rules of evidence in court.

Both statutory declarations and affidavits must be signed and witnessed by a commissioner of oaths or a notary public.

When is a statutory declaration required in Canadian law?

Statutory declarations may be required by government agencies, financial institutions, employers, or other organisations in order to confirm the accuracy of information or to comply with legal or regulatory requirements. A statutory declaration is authorized by the Canada Evidence Act and is used to assert the truth of any fact or facts, or of any account rendered in writing. A person is guilty of an offence if he/she makes a false statutory declaration. In some cases, statutory declarations may be required by law as a condition of eligibility for certain benefits or privileges. It is important to ensure that all required statutory declarations are accurate and truthful, as making a false declaration can have serious legal consequences.

If you’re planning to register a vehicle to a business in Ontario and require a RIN Request Letter, you’re in the right place.

A RIN is a unique 9-digit identification number that is assigned to a business by Ontario’s Ministry of Transportation (MTO). This number is used to identify the corporation or business as the registered owner of a vehicle, rather than an individual.

To obtain a RIN, you’ll need to provide the MTO with some basic information about your corporation or business, including:

  • its name
  • address
  • business number
  • a notarized RIN request letter
What is a RIN Request Letter for Company Vehicle in Ontario?

In Ontario, A RIN is a 9-digit number the MTO assigns to a company vehicle. This number demonstrates that a business has registered its company vehicle(s) with the Ministry of Transportation. In order to get a RIN, you need to send the MTO a RIN request letter, and have it sworn before a notary public or commissioner of oaths. In the RIN request letter, you would request that a vehicle be registered under your business’s name.

Once the MTO receives the request letter, they will review it and verify the information you provided. If the request is approved, the MTO will issue your business a unique 9-digit RIN with a barcode.

What Details Does a RIN Letter Require?

When requesting a RIN for your company, you’ll need to provide the MTO with some basic information about your corporation or business, including:

  • Your full name and position at the company
  • Your corporation’s name
  • Your corporate address
  • The purpose of your RIN letter request
  • Make, model, year, colour, and class
  • Vehicle identification number
What Other Documents Do I Need with a RIN Request Letter?

The specific documents required may vary depending on the type of business, but in general, the following documents should be included:

  • A notarized RIN request letter written by someone with the authority to bind the organization, like an owner or director. A notary public must verify your identity, verify your business documents, and affix a notarial seal to your RIN letter.
  • One identification document for your business (e.g., articles of incorporation or amendment, or a letter of good standing).
  • Two documents that show proof of your business’s address (e.g., an insurance pink slip or a copy of a utility bill). These can be physical copies or digital.
  • Identification documents for the person authorized to sign the request letter, such as a driver’s license or passport.
  • A detailed description of the business or organization’s activities and how they relate to vehicle registration.

It is important to carefully review the MTO’s requirements on their website and ensure that all necessary documents are included to avoid any delays in the processing of the application.

How Do I Apply for a RIN Number for a Business Vehicle in Ontario?

To apply for a RIN number to register a business vehicle in Ontario, you need to send a notarized request letter to the MTO. The letter should include your business or organization’s name, address, phone number, and any other relevant information requested by the MTO. You will also need to provide documentation proving your eligibility for a RIN, such as business registration documents and identification documents for the person authorized to sign the request letter.

For more detailed information for applying for a RIN number for your business, please refer to our blog, Guide to Ontario’s Registrant Identification Number (RIN).

Have a minor travelling alone or without one legal guardian? You’re in the right place.

The Government of Canada strongly recommends that children under the age of majority (18 or 19, depending on the province or territory of residence) carry a notarized travel consent letter when travelling:

  • Alone
  • With only one parent
  • With relatives
    What is a travel consent letter for children travelling abroad?

    A Travel Consent Letter, sometimes referred to as a consent to travel letter, or child travel consent form, is a legal document that gives permission for a child to travel outside their home country alone, with one one of their parents, or with another guardian. This letter is usually required by immigration authorities to prove that the child has the consent of their parents or legal guardians to travel and that the child is not being abducted or taken out of the country without their knowledge or approval. When you create a travel consent letter, important information about the child including their full name, date of birth, passport number, travel itinerary, and contact information for their parents or legal guardians, must be included.

    Without a letter you may not be able to travel with your child – this includes being prevented from boarding flights until authorities can get into contact with the other parent or guardian.

    What details or information does the travel consent letter contain?

    Travel Consent Letters should always include the full names of the child and their parents or legal guardians, the date the letter was written and signed, and a clear statement of consent for the child to travel. It is also important to have the letter notarized to make it an official legal document. Travel consent letters can help prevent potential problems or delays at border crossings and ensure that the child’s travel experience is safe and hassle-free.

    What other documents do I need with the travel consent letter?

    In addition to the Travel Consent Letter and often a provincial birth certificate, children are also required to have their own valid passport. Depending on family circumstances, the following documents may also be required:

    • Divorce papers
    • Child custody orders or agreements
    • Death certificate of a parent or parents
    Do both parents need to sign the Travel Consent Letter?

    Travel Consent Letters should be signed by parents who are not accompanying the child on a trip, including: One or both parents who are married or in a common-law relationship and live together with the child. Both parents usually have custody rights over the child.

    However, the Government of Canada also recommends that you contact a lawyer about you and your children’s unique situation.

    I’m a teen travelling with friends – do I need a travel consent letter?
    If you’re travelling abroad with friends (or siblings!) who are above the age of majority, it’s still best to be prepared with a consent letter signed by both of your parents.  Make sure that your letter explains that they are in support of your trip and that your travel companions are acting as your guardians; be sure to include all your parents’ contact information as well.

    With guardians who are not related (like when they’re on a school trip)

A Statutory Declaration of Common-Law Union is:
  • Used to establish the legal recognition of a common-law relationship.
  • Provides proof of the duration and nature of the relationship.
  • Allows you and your partner to access certain benefits and rights available to legally recognized couples.
What is a Statutory Declaration of Common-Law Union?
In Canada, a statutory declaration of common-law union is a legal document that serves as evidence of a common-law relationship. By submitting this declaration, you and your partner affirm that you have been living together in a committed relationship, similar to a marriage, but without a formal marriage certificate. This document helps establish the legal recognition of your common-law union for various purposes within Canada.
What details or information does a Statutory Declaration of Common-Law Union contain?
A statutory declaration of common-law union typically includes the following details:
  • Personal Information: The declaration should include the full legal names, current addresses, dates of birth, and contact information of both partners.
  • Relationship Details: The declaration should outline the nature and duration of the common-law relationship, including the date when you and your partner began living together as a couple.
  • Shared Life: The declaration may require you to provide information about how you and your partner share responsibilities, finances, and make joint decisions.
  • Witness Information: The declaration usually includes space for the signature and contact information of one or more witnesses who can attest to the authenticity of your relationship.
  • Notarization: The declaration should include a section for both partners to sign the document in the presence of a notary public or commissioner of oaths. The notary will then use their official seal or stamp and sign the document to certify its authenticity.

Please note that the exact details and information required in a statutory declaration of common-law union may vary depending on the specific requirements of your jurisdiction or the purpose for which the declaration is being prepared. It is advisable to consult with a legal professional to ensure all necessary information is included.

When would I need a Statutory Declaration of Common-Law Union?
You may need to use a statutory declaration of common-law union if you and your partner have been living together in a committed relationship without being legally married. This document helps establish the legal recognition of your common-law union and may be required for various purposes, such as accessing benefits, rights, or proving your relationship for immigration or legal matters.
Do I need to have my Statutory Declaration of Common-Law Union notarized?
Yes! A statutory declaration of common-law union needs to be notarized. This document requires both partners to sign the declaration in the presence of a notary public or commissioner of oaths.
Need help writing an affidavit? If you’re involved in a Canadian legal proceeding and require a notarized custom affidavit, you’re in the right place.

A general affidavit is a legal document that is used to provide evidence in court or to support other legal proceedings. The contents of an affidavit must be true, accurate, and complete to the best of the affiant’s (the person swearing the affidavit) knowledge and belief. A general affidavit can be used in various legal matters, such as:

  • civil litigation,
  • family law,
  • Canadian immigration,
  • and more
What is a general affidavit in Canada?

An affidavit in Canada is a legal document that contains a sworn statement of facts relevant to a particular legal matter. It is used as evidence in court or to support other legal proceedings. An affidavit template may be used to help you create a customized document for your legal proceedings.

It’s important to note that oaths in the country of Canada are required when providing a solemn affirmation or making a sworn statement. When someone signs an affidavit, they are doing so under oath in the presence of a notary public or another person who is authorized to administer oaths, like a commissioner of oaths.

How do I customize my affidavit?

A general affidavit in Canada should include all the necessary information to support the legal matter at hand. The information should be true, accurate, and complete to the best of the your knowledge and belief. Here are some of the key elements that should be included:

  • The heading: This should state the name of the court or administrative tribunal, the name of the case or application, and the name of the person who swore the affidavit.
  • The date and place of the affidavit: This should be stated at the beginning of the document, and should include the city, province or territory.
  • An introduction: This should include the person who swore the affidavit’s full name, address, occupation, and relationship to the others involved.
  • The body of the affidavit: This is where you’ll write a include a clear and concise statement of relevant facts. The facts should be organised in a logical manner and should be supported by any available documentation or evidence. A good affidavit has all the information a judge needs to make a decision.
  • A statement of the affiant’s (the person swearing the affidavit) belief in the truth of the information provided:After you finished stating your facts and beliefs, this statement may appear as something like, “I swear (or affirm) that the contents of this affidavit are true to the best of my knowledge and belief.”
  • The signature of the person swearing the affidavit: After a person creates an affidavit, it should be signed in the presence of a notary public or commissioner of oaths (commissioner authorized to administer oaths).
  • The signature of the notary public or commissioner of oaths: This person is authorized to administer oaths, and will certify that the affidavit was sworn or affirmed before them.

The specific requirements may vary depending on the nature of the legal matter and the rules of the court or administrative tribunal involved. It is always advisable to seek legal advice or guidance from a qualified professional when dealing with legal matters that require an affidavit.

What is the difference between an Affidavit and a Statutory Declaration in Canada?

An affidavit is a written statement of fact that is sworn or affirmed to be true. It is typically used in legal proceedings and is subject to the rules of evidence in court.

A statutory declaration is also a written statement of fact that is declared to be true. It is typically used outside of court, such as in administrative matters or for the purposes of obtaining government services.

Both statutory declarations and affidavits must be signed and witnessed by a commissioner of oaths or a notary public.

When is an affidavit required in Canadian law?

This document may be required in Canadian law to support various legal proceedings, such as civil litigation, family law, immigration applications, and more. It may be used to provide evidence or to support an application or claim.

  • Civil Litigation: In civil litigation, parties may be required to provide affidavits to support their claims or defences. For example, a party may need to provide a sworn statement of the damages they have suffered as a result of the someone’s actions.
  • Family Law: In family law matters, affidavits may be required to support applications for custody, access, or child support. For example, a parent may need to outline their relationship with the child and why they are seeking custody or access.
  • Immigration Applications: Affidavits may be required to support various immigration applications, such as spousal sponsorship or permanent residency. For example, a Canadian citizen sponsoring their spouse for immigration may need to provide a written statement about the nature of their relationship and/or marital status and their plans for living together in Canada.
  • Criminal Proceedings: In criminal proceedings, affidavits may be used to support various applications, such as bail or search warrants. For example, a police officer may need to provide an affidavit outlining the grounds for a search warrant.
  • Administrative Law: In administrative law, affidavits may be required to support applications or appeals before administrative tribunals. For example, a person appealing a decision by the Canada Revenue Agency or the Goverment of Canada may need to provide the relevant facts and their arguments in writing.
More simply, you may need to write an affidavit for a situation involving documenting a relationship on behalf of someone else, in cases of theft or destruction to your personal property for criminal investigations or insurance claims, to collect evidence of your personal relationship for immigration or visa purposes, to create an “affidavit of support” for financial reasons – (often used for post-secondary education fees abroad), or for visitor visas to Canada.

In general, an affidavit may be required whenever it is necessary to provide evidence or support for a legal proceeding. The specific requirements may vary, so it’s always a good idea to speak with a lawyer or other legal professional about your unique case

This document outlines:
  • the terms of sale,
  • identifies the parties involved, and
  • serves as proof of the transaction.

Understanding the importance of a bill of sale and how to create one can help ensure a smooth and secure transfer of property.

What is a Bill of Sale?
A bill of sale is a written agreement that documents the sale of personal property from one party to another. In Canada, it serves as a legally binding contract between the buyer and the seller, establishing the transfer of ownership rights. This document outlines essential details such as the description of the property, purchase price, date of the sale, and the names and contact information of both parties involved. A bill of sale is essential for both parties as it provides evidence of the transaction and can be used for various purposes, including registration, insurance, or proof of ownership.
Why is a Bill of Sale important?
A bill of sale is important for several reasons:
  • Proof of Ownership: It establishes the legal transfer of ownership from the seller to the buyer, providing clear evidence of who owns the property.
  • Transaction Details: It records important information about the sale, including the purchase price, date, and description of the property. This helps prevent disputes or misunderstandings in the future.
  • Legal Protection: It protects both the buyer and the seller by documenting the terms and conditions of the sale, ensuring that both parties are aware of their rights and responsibilities.
  • Compliance Requirements: Depending on the type of property being sold, certain government agencies or institutions may require a bill of sale for registration, licensing, or insurance purposes.
What information should a Bill of Sale contain?
A bill of sale typically includes the following information:
  • Description of the Property: A detailed description of the item being sold, including any unique identifiers such as serial numbers or VIN (Vehicle Identification Number).
  • Purchase Price: The agreed-upon price for the property being sold.
  • Date of Sale: The specific date when the transaction took place.
  • Seller and Buyer Information: The full legal names, addresses, and contact information of both the seller and the buyer.
  • Payment Details: The method of payment used for the transaction (e.g., cash, check, or online transfer).
  • Warranty and Condition: Any warranties or guarantees provided by the seller, as well as a description of the current condition of the property.
  • Signatures: Signatures of both the seller and the buyer to indicate their agreement and acceptance of the terms.

Please note that the exact information required in a bill of sale may vary depending on the type of property being sold and the specific requirements of your jurisdiction. It is advisable to consult with a legal professional or use a reputable bill of sale template to ensure all necessary information is included.

Do I need to have my Bill of Sale notarized?

While notarization of a Bill of Sale is not always required, it can be a good idea to have it notarized for added legal security and authenticity.

Notarization can provide peace of mind and added protection in case of any future legal complications or disputes. It is recommended to consult with a legal professional or the relevant authorities to determine if notarization is necessary or advisable for your specific transaction.